Essential Physics 1st edition

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Andrew Duffy
Publisher: Custom Labs

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  • Chapter 0: Survey Questions
    • 0.P
    • 0.PRE (2)
    • 0.Extra Problems

  • Chapter AC: Appendix - Alternating Current
    • AC.P (9)
    • AC.PRE
    • AC.Extra Problems

  • Chapter 1: Introduction
    • 1.1: Physics, Models, and Units
    • 1.2: Unit Conversions, and Significant Figures
    • 1.3: Trigonometry, Algebra, and Dimensional Analysis
    • 1.4: Vectors
    • 1.5: Adding Vectors
    • 1.6: Coordinate Systems
    • 1.7: The Quadratic Formula
    • 1.P (16)
    • 1.PRE (2)
    • 1.Extra Problems

  • Chapter 2: Motion in One Dimension
    • 2.1: Position, Displacement, and Distance
    • 2.2: Velocity and Speed
    • 2.3: Different Representations of Motion
    • 2.4: Constant-Velocity Motion
    • 2.5: Acceleration
    • 2.6: Equations for Motion with Constant Acceleration
    • 2.7: Example Problem
    • 2.8: Solving Constant-Acceleration Problems
    • 2.P (30)
    • 2.PRE (5)
    • 2.Extra Problems

  • Chapter 3: Forces and Newton's Law
    • 3.1: Making Things Move
    • 3.2: Free-Body Diagrams
    • 3.3: Constant Velocity, Acceleration, and Force
    • 3.4: Connecting Force and Motion
    • 3.5: Newton's Laws of Motion
    • 3.6: Exploring Forces and Free-Body Diagrams
    • 3.7: Practice with Free-Body Diagrams
    • 3.8: A Method for Solving Problems Involving Newton's Laws
    • 3.9: Practicing the Method
    • 3.P (19)
    • 3.PRE (4)
    • 3.Extra Problems

  • Chapter 4: Motion in Two Dimensions
    • 4.1: Relative Velocity in One Dimension
    • 4.2: Combining Relative Velocity and Motion
    • 4.3: Relative Velocity in Two Dimensions
    • 4.4: Projectile Motion
    • 4.5: The Independence of x and y
    • 4.6: An Example of Projectile Motion
    • 4.7: Graphs for Projectile Motion
    • 4.8: Range
    • 4.P (23)
    • 4.PRE (5)
    • 4.Extra Problems

  • Chapter 5: Applications of Newton's Laws
    • 5.1: Kinetic Friction
    • 5.2: Static Friction
    • 5.3: Measuring the Coefficient of Friction
    • 5.4: A System of Two Objects and a Pulley
    • 5.5: Uniform Circular Motion
    • 5.6: Solving Problems Involving Uniform Circular Motion
    • 5.7: Using Whole Vectors
    • 5.8: Vertical Circular Motion
    • 5.P (28)
    • 5.PRE (9)
    • 5.Extra Problems

  • Chapter 6: Linking Forces to Momentum and Energy
    • 6.1: Rewriting Newton's Second Law
    • 6.2: Relating Momentum and Impulse
    • 6.3: Implication of Newton's Third Law: Momentum is Conserved
    • 6.4: Center of Mass
    • 6.5: Playing with a Constant Acceleration Equation
    • 6.6: Conservative Forces and Potential Energy
    • 6.7: Power
    • 6.P (16)
    • 6.PRE (7)
    • 6.Extra Problems

  • Chapter 7: Conservation of Energy and Conservation of Momentum
    • 7.1: The Law of Conservation of Energy
    • 7.2: Comparing the Energy and Force Approaches
    • 7.3: Energy Bar Graphs: Visualizing Energy Transfer
    • 7.4: Momentum and Collisions
    • 7.5: Classifying Collisions
    • 7.6: Collisions in Two Dimensions
    • 7.7: Combining Energy and Momentum
    • 7.P (16)
    • 7.PRE (4)
    • 7.Extra Problems

  • Chapter 8: Gravity
    • 8.1: Newton's Law of Universal Gravitation
    • 8.2: The Principle of Superposition
    • 8.3: Gravitational Field
    • 8.4: Gravitational Potential Energy
    • 8.5: Example Problems
    • 8.6: Orbits
    • 8.7: Orbits and Energy
    • 8.P (9)
    • 8.PRE (1)
    • 8.Extra Problems

  • Chapter 9: Fluids
    • 9.1: The Buoyant Force
    • 9.2: Using Force Methods with Fluids
    • 9.3: Archimedes' Principle
    • 9.4: Solving Buoyancy Problems
    • 9.5: An Example Buoyancy Problem
    • 9.6: Pressure
    • 9.7: Atmospheric Pressure
    • 9.8: Fluid Dynamics
    • 9.9: Examples Involving Bernoulli's Equation
    • 9.P (23)
    • 9.PRE (6)
    • 9.Extra Problems

  • Chapter 10: Rotation I: Rotational Kinematics and Torque
    • 10.1: Rotational Kinematics
    • 10.2: Connecting Rotational Motion to Linear Motion
    • 10.3: Solving Rotational Kinematics Problems
    • 10.4: Torque
    • 10.5: Three Equivalent Methods of Finding Torque
    • 10.6: Rotational Inertia
    • 10.7: An Example Problem Involving Rotational Inertia
    • 10.8: A Table of Rotational Inertias
    • 10.9: Newton's Laws of Rotation
    • 10.10: Static Equilibrium
    • 10.11: A General Method for Solving Static Equilibrium Problems
    • 10.12: Further Investigations of Static Equilibrium
    • 10.P (19)
    • 10.PRE (3)
    • 10.Extra Problems

  • Chapter 11: Rotation II: Rotational Dynamics
    • 11.1: Applying Newton's Second Law for Rotation
    • 11.2: A General Method, and Rolling without Slipping
    • 11.3: Further Investigations of Rolling
    • 11.4: Combining Rolling and Newton's Second Law for Rotation
    • 11.5: Analyzing the Motion of a Spool
    • 11.6: Angular Momentum
    • 11.7: Considering Conservation, and Rotational Kinetic Energy
    • 11.8: Racing Shapes
    • 11.9: Rotational Impulse and Rotational Work
    • 11.P (19)
    • 11.PRE (4)
    • 11.Extra Problems

  • Chapter 12: Simple Harmonic Motion
    • 12.1: Hooke's Law
    • 12.2: Springs and Energy Conservation
    • 12.3: An Example Involving Springs and Energy
    • 12.4: The Connection with Circular Motion
    • 12.5: Hallmarks of Simple Harmonic Motion
    • 12.6: Examples Involving Simple Harmonic Motion
    • 12.7: The Simple Pendulum
    • 12.P (10)
    • 12.PRE (3)
    • 12.Extra Problems (1)

  • Chapter 13: Thermal Physics: A Macroscopic View
    • 13.1: Temperature Scales
    • 13.2: Thermal Expansion
    • 13.3: Specific Heat
    • 13.4: Latent Heat
    • 13.5: Solving Thermal Equilibrium Problems
    • 13.6: Energy-Transfer Mechanisms
    • 13.P (11)
    • 13.PRE (3)
    • 13.Extra Problems

  • Chapter 14: Thermal Physics: A Microscopic View
    • 14.1: The Ideal Gas Law
    • 14.2: Kinetic Theory
    • 14.3: Temperature
    • 14.4: Example Problems
    • 14.5: The Maxwell-Boltzmann Distribution; Equipartition
    • 14.6: The P-V Diagram
    • 14.P (6)
    • 14.PRE (1)
    • 14.Extra Problems

  • Chapter 15: The Laws of Thermodynamics
    • 15.1: The First Law of Thermodynamics
    • 15.2: Work, and Internal Energy
    • 15.3: Constant Volume and Constant Pressure Processes
    • 15.4: Constant Temperature and Adiabatic Processes
    • 15.5: A Summary of Thermodynamic Processes
    • 15.6: Thermodynamic Cycles
    • 15.7: Entropy and the Second Law of Thermodynamics
    • 15.8: Heat Engines
    • 15.P (11)
    • 15.PRE (3)
    • 15.Extra Problems

  • Chapter 16: Electric Charge and Electric Field
    • 16.1: Electric Charge
    • 16.2: Charging an Object
    • 16.3: Coulomb's Law
    • 16.4: Applying the Principle of Superposition
    • 16.5: The Electric Field
    • 16.6: Electric Field: Special Cases
    • 16.7: Electric Field Near Conductors
    • 16.P (24)
    • 16.PRE (5)
    • 16.Extra Problems

  • Chapter 17: Electric Potential Energy and Electric Potential
    • 17.1: Electric Potential Energy
    • 17.2: Example Problems Involving Potential Energy
    • 17.3: Electric Potential
    • 17.4: Electric Potential for a Point Change
    • 17.5: Working with Force, Field, Potential Energy, and Potential
    • 17.6: Capacitors and Dielectrics
    • 17.7: Energy in a Capacitor, and a Capacitor Example
    • 17.P (25)
    • 17.PRE (5)
    • 17.Extra Problems

  • Chapter 18: DC (Direct Current) Circuits
    • 18.1: Current, and Batteries
    • 18.2: Resistance and Ohm's Law
    • 18.3: Circuit Analogies, and Kirchoff's Rules
    • 18.4: Power, the Cost of Electricity, and AC Circuits
    • 18.5: Resistors in Series
    • 18.6: Resistors in Parallel
    • 18.7: Series-Parallel Combination Circuits
    • 18.8: An Example Problem; and Meters
    • 18.9: Multi-loop Circuits
    • 18.10: RC Circuits
    • 18.P (31)
    • 18.PRE (5)
    • 18.Extra Problems

  • Chapter 19: Magnetism
    • 19.1: The Magnetic Field
    • 19.2: The Magnetic Force on a Charged Object
    • 19.3: Using the Right-hand Rule
    • 19.4: Mass Spectrometer: An Application of Force on a Change
    • 19.5: The Magnetic Force on a Current-Carrying Wire
    • 19.6: The Magnetic Torque on a Current Loop
    • 19.7: Magnetic Field from a Long Straight Wire
    • 19.8: Magnetic Field from Loops and Coils
    • 19.P (15)
    • 19.PRE (2)
    • 19.Extra Problems

  • Chapter 20: Generating Electricity
    • 20.1: Magnetic Flux
    • 20.2: Faraday's Law of Induction
    • 20.3: Lenz's Law, and a Pictorial Method
    • 20.4: Motional Emf
    • 20.5: Eddy Currents
    • 20.6: Electrical Generators
    • 20.7: Transformers and the Transmission of Electricity
    • 20.P (20)
    • 20.PRE (6)
    • 20.Extra Problems

  • Chapter 21: Waves and Sound
    • 21.1: Waves
    • 21.2: The Connection with Simple Harmonic Motion
    • 21.3: Frequency, Speed, and Wavelength
    • 21.4: Sound and Sound Intensity
    • 21.5: The Doppler Effect for Sound
    • 21.6: Sonic Booms, and the Doppler Effect in General
    • 21.7: Superposition and Interference
    • 21.8: Beats; and Reflection
    • 21.9: Standing Waves on Strings
    • 21.10: Standing Waves in Pipes
    • 21.P (25)
    • 21.PRE (4)
    • 21.Extra Problems

  • Chapter 22: Electromagnetic Waves
    • 22.1: Maxwell's Equations
    • 22.2: Electromagnetic Waves and the Electromagnetic Spectrum
    • 22.3: Energy, Momentum and Radiation Pressure
    • 22.4: The Doppler Effect for EM Waves
    • 22.5: Polarized Light
    • 22.6: Applications of Polarized Light
    • 22.P (14)
    • 22.PRE (2)
    • 22.Extra Problems

  • Chapter 23: Reflection and Mirrors
    • 23.1: The Ray Model of Light
    • 23.2: The Law of Reflection; Plane Mirrors
    • 23.3: Spherical Mirrors: Ray Diagrams
    • 23.4: A Qualitative Approach: Image Characteristics
    • 23.5: A Quantitative Approach: The Mirror Equation
    • 23.6: Analyzing the Concave Mirror
    • 23.7: An Example Problem
    • 23.P (9)
    • 23.PRE
    • 23.Extra Problems

  • Chapter 24: Refraction and Lenses
    • 24.1: Refraction
    • 24.2: Total Internal Reflection
    • 24.3: Dispersion
    • 24.4: Image Formation by Thin Lenses
    • 24.5: Lens Concepts
    • 24.6: A Quantitative Approach: The Thin-Lens Equation
    • 24.7: Analyzing a Converging Lens
    • 24.8: An Example Problem Involving a Lens
    • 24.9: The Human Eye and the Camera
    • 24.10: Multi-lens Systems
    • 24.P (14)
    • 24.PRE (3)
    • 24.Extra Problems

  • Chapter 25: Interference and Diffraction
    • 25.1: Interference from Two Sources
    • 25.2: The Diffraction Grating
    • 25.3: Diffraction from a Single Slit
    • 25.4: Diffraction: Double Slits and Circular Openings
    • 25.5: Reflection
    • 25.6: Thin-Film Interference: The Five-Step Method
    • 25.7: Applying the Five-Step Method
    • 25.P (20)
    • 25.PRE (3)
    • 25.Extra Problems

  • Chapter 26: Special Relativity
    • 26.1: Observers
    • 26.2: Spacetime and the Spacetime Interval
    • 26.3: Time Dilation - Moving Clocks Run Slowly
    • 26.4: Length Contraction
    • 26.5: The Breakdown of Simultaneity
    • 26.P (2)
    • 26.PRE (1)
    • 26.Extra Problems

  • Chapter 27: The Quantum World
    • 27.1: Planck Solves the Ultraviolet Catastrophe
    • 27.2: Einstein Explains the Photoelectric Effect
    • 27.3: A Photoelectric Effect Example
    • 27.4: Photons Carry Momentum
    • 27.5: Particles Act Like Waves
    • 27.6: Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle
    • 27.P (8)
    • 27.PRE (2)
    • 27.Extra Problems

  • Chapter 28: The Atom
    • 28.1: Line Spectra and the Hydrogen Atom
    • 28.2: Models of the Atom
    • 28.3: The Quantum Mechanical View of the Atom
    • 28.4: The Pauli Exclusion Principle
    • 28.5: Understanding the Periodic Table
    • 28.6: Some Applications of Quantum Mechanics
    • 28.P (8)
    • 28.PRE
    • 28.Extra Problems

  • Chapter 29: The Nucleus
    • 29.1: What Holds the Nucleus Together?
    • 29.2: E = mc2
    • 29.3: Radioactive Decay Processes
    • 29.4: The Chart of the Nuclides
    • 29.5: Radioactivity
    • 29.6: Nuclear Fusion and Nuclear Fission
    • 29.7: Applications of Nuclear Physics
    • 29.8: A Table of Isotopes
    • 29.P (12)
    • 28.PRE (2)
    • 29.Extra Problems

Questions Available within WebAssign

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Question Group Key
P - Problems
PRE - Pre Session Questions
XP - Extra Problems


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Group Quantity Questions
Chapter 0: Survey Questions
0.Pre 2 000 001
Chapter AC: Appendix - Alternating Current
AC.P 9 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109
Chapter 1: Introduction
1.P 16 002 006 009 010 026 026.alt 026.alt2 026.alt3 028 035 039 043 101 102 103 104
1.PRE 2 001 002
Chapter 2: Motion in One Dimension
2.P 30 001 001.alt 005 011 018 018.new 019 035 045 052 055 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 201 202
2.PRE 5 000 003 004 005 006
Chapter 3: Forces and Newton's Law
3.P 19 012 018 025 026 036 042 043 050 051.alt 052 060 100 101 101.alt 102 102.alt 103 104 105
3.PRE 4 001 002 003 004.alt
Chapter 4: Motion in Two Dimensions
4.P 23 005 006.partial 014 022 027 028 038 041 044 048 053 056 060 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 109.V2
4.PRE 5 001 002 003 004 006
Chapter 5: Applications of Newton's Laws
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5.PRE 8 001 002 003 004 005 006 009 010
5.Pre 1 011
Chapter 6: Linking Forces to Momentum and Energy
6.P 16 X X.v2 014.and.015a 031 032 033 034 038 042 048 055 056 058 060 102 102.mod
6.PRE 7 001 002 003 004 005 006 009
Chapter 7: Conservation of Energy and Conservation of Momentum
7.P 16 013.and.015 020 025 028 030 031.ab 038 042 044.and.045 049.ish 055 058.b 101 102 103 104
7.PRE 4 001 002 003 005
Chapter 8: Gravity
8.P 9 Like.16.P.056 Like.1622 Like.1704 003 016 051 101 102 103
8.PRE 1 001
Chapter 9: Fluids
9.P 23 018.alt 021 021.v2 024 029 031 032 037 038 045 052 053 057 059 063 064 065 066 067 071 101 102 103
9.PRE 5 001 002 003 007 008
9.Pre 1 009
Chapter 10: Rotation I: Rotational Kinematics and Torque
10.P 19 009 014 015 017 020 021.expanded 024 028 029 038 042 043 046 054 057 060.ish 101 102 103
10.PRE 3 001 002 003
Chapter 11: Rotation II: Rotational Dynamics
11.P 19 018 029.and.030 031 032 033 033.v2 034 036 036.v2 038 042 045 047 048 054 056 057 059 102
11.PRE 4 001 002 003 004
Chapter 12: Simple Harmonic Motion
12.P 10 003 028 029 032 035 101 102 103 104 105
12.PRE 2 001 002
12.Pre 1 004
12.XP 1 001
Chapter 13: Thermal Physics: A Macroscopic View
13.P 11 017 019 025 026 030 033 034 054 058 058.AB 101
13.PRE 2 001 001.alt
13.Pre 1 003
Chapter 14: Thermal Physics: A Microscopic View
14.P 6 014 016 022 022.a 030 035
14.PRE 1 001
Chapter 15: The Laws of Thermodynamics
15.P 11 002 015 022 024 032 036 038 043 044 056.b 101
15.PRE 3 001 002 005
Chapter 16: Electric Charge and Electric Field
16.P 24 002 002.alternate 014 016 022 029 032 034 039 042 052 054 055 056 059 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109
16.PRE 5 001 002 003 004 009
Chapter 17: Electric Potential Energy and Electric Potential
17.P 25 004 004.twopoints 012 013 015 018 019.d 034 035 039.b 040 042 043 045 056 058.mod 059.mod 101 102 103 104 104.PE 105 106 107
17.PRE 5 001 002 003 005 007
Chapter 18: DC (Direct Current) Circuits
18.P 31 006 017.b 018 020 023 024 032.b 034 037 037.var 038.var 042 048 051 052 055 057 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 114 115 116 117
18.PRE 4 001 002 003 004
18.Pre 1 007
Chapter 19: Magnetism
19.P 15 002.v1 006 011.v1 012 013 015 016 040 046 050 058 059 100.v1 101 102
19.PRE 2 001 005
Chapter 20: Generating Electricity
20.P 20 001a.and.002b.v1 006.v1 013.a.v1 026.v1 028 030 031 032 040 041 044 046 053 055.alternate 058 101.v1 102.v1 103.v1 104 105
20.PRE 6 001 002.v1 003 004 005 007
Chapter 21: Waves and Sound
21.P 25 002 002.alt 002.v3 006.alt 016.mod 018 026 028 029 031 041 042 042.alt 046.b 058 101 102 102.alt 103 104 105.v1 105.v2 106 107 108
21.PRE 4 001 002 003 004
Chapter 22: Electromagnetic Waves
22.P 14 018 020 022 023 028 034 042 046 048.and.049 052 052.a 058 101 102
22.PRE 2 001 002
Chapter 23: Reflection and Mirrors
23.P 9 018 022 026 028 034 036 042 048 053.and.054
Chapter 24: Refraction and Lenses
24.P 14 015 016 018 020 020.alt 030 034 040 044 046 101 102 103 104
24.PRE 3 001 002 003
Chapter 25: Interference and Diffraction
25.P 20 001 020 026 028 028.alternate 029 029.v2 030 035a.and.036b 035a.and.036b.v2 035a.and.036b.v3 042 050 052 052.v2 052.v3 101 102 103 104
25.PRE 3 001 002 003
Chapter 26: Special Relativity
26.P 2 019 024
26.PRE 1 001
Chapter 27: The Quantum World
27.P 8 014 016.eV 024 038 044 046 054 101
27.PRE 2 001 002
Chapter 28: The Atom
28.P 8 013 016 030 037 048 049 057 102
Chapter 29: The Nucleus
29.P 12 007.mod 007.mod2 009 013.mod 021 026 028 038 056 058 103 104
29.PRE 2 001 002
 Chapter 30
30 0  
 Chapter 31
31 0  
Total 595