College Physics: A Strategic Approach 2nd edition

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Randall D. Knight, Brian Jones and Stuart Field
Publisher: Pearson Education


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  • Chapter 1: Force and Motion
    • 1.1: Motion: A First Look
    • 1.2: Position and Time: Putting Numbers on Nature
    • 1.3: Velocity
    • 1.4: A Sense of Scale: Significant Figures, Scientific Notation, and Units (6)
    • 1.5: Vectors and Motion: A First Look
    • 1: General Problems
    • 1: Conceptual Questions (2)
    • 1: Extra Problems (1)

  • Chapter 2: Motion in One Dimension
    • 2.1: Describing Motion
    • 2.2: Uniform Motion (1)
    • 2.3: Instantaneous Velocity (2)
    • 2.4: Acceleration (1)
    • 2.5: Motion with Constant Acceleration (1)
    • 2.6: Solving One-Dimensional Motion Problems
    • 2.7: Free Fall (1)
    • 2: General Problems (9)
    • 2: Conceptual Questions
    • 2: Extra Problems (6)

  • Chapter 3: Vectors and Motion in Two Dimensions
    • 3.1: Using Vectors
    • 3.2: Using Vectors on Motion Diagrams
    • 3.3: Coordinate Systems and Vector Components (7)
    • 3.4: Motion on a Ramp
    • 3.5: Relative Motion (1)
    • 3.6: Motion in Two Dimensions: Projectile Motion
    • 3.7: Projectile Motion: Solving Problems (3)
    • 3.8: Motion in Two Dimensions: Circular Motion
    • 3: General Problems (16)
    • 3: Conceptual Questions
    • 3: Extra Problems (5)

  • Chapter 4: Forces and Newton's Laws of Motion
    • 4.1: What Causes Motion?
    • 4.2: Force
    • 4.3: A Short Catalog of Forces
    • 4.4: Identifying Forces (2)
    • 4.5: What Do Forces Do? (4)
    • 4.6: Newton's Second Law (1)
    • 4.7: Free-Body Diagrams
    • 4.8: Newton's Third Law
    • 4: General Problems (6)
    • 4: Conceptual Questions
    • 4: Extra Problems (2)

  • Chapter 5: Applying Newton's Laws
    • 5.1: Equilibrium (4)
    • 5.2: Dynamics and Newton's Second Law (3)
    • 5.3: Mass and Weight (5)
    • 5.4: Normal Forces
    • 5.5: Friction (4)
    • 5.6: Drag (2)
    • 5.7: Interacting Objects (2)
    • 5.8: Ropes and Pulleys (2)
    • 5: General Problems (11)
    • 5: Conceptual Questions
    • 5: Extra Problems (2)

  • Chapter 6: Circular Motion, Orbits, and Gravity
    • 6.1: Uniform Circular Motion (2)
    • 6.2: Speed, Velocity, and Acceleration in Uniform Circular Motion (1)
    • 6.3: Dynamics of a Uniform Circular Motion (2)
    • 6.4: Apparent Forces in Circular Motion (3)
    • 6.5: Circular Orbits and Weightlessness
    • 6.6: Newton's Law of Gravity (1)
    • 6.7: Gravity and Orbits (2)
    • 6: General Problems (14)
    • 6: Conceptual Questions
    • 6: Extra Problems (3)

  • Chapter 7: Rotational Motion
    • 7.1: The Rotation of a Rigid Body
    • 7.2: Torque (1)
    • 7.3: Gravitational Torque and the Center of Gravity (1)
    • 7.4: Rotational Dynamics and Moment of Inertia
    • 7.5: Using Newton's Second Law for Rotation
    • 7.6: Rolling Motion
    • 7: General Problems (8)
    • 7: Conceptual Questions
    • 7: Extra Problems (1)

  • Chapter 8: Equilibrium and Elasticity
    • 8.1: Torque and Static Equilibrium (2)
    • 8.2: Stability and Balance
    • 8.3: Springs and Hooke's Law (1)
    • 8.4: Stretching and Compressing Materials (2)
    • 8: General Problems (4)
    • 8: Conceptual Questions
    • 8: Extra Problems

  • Chapter 9: Momentum
    • 9.1: Impulse
    • 9.2: Momentum and the Impulse-Momentum Theorem (2)
    • 9.3: Solving Impulse and Momentum Problems (2)
    • 9.4: Conservation of Momentum (2)
    • 9.5: Inelastic Collisions (2)
    • 9.6: Momentum and Collisions in Two Dimensions (2)
    • 9.7: Angular Momentum (2)
    • 9: General Problems (14)
    • 9: Conceptual Questions
    • 9: Extra Problems (3)

  • Chapter 10: Energy and Work
    • 10.1: The Basic Energy Model
    • 10.2: Work (2)
    • 10.3: Kinetic Energy (3)
    • 10.4: Potential Energy (3)
    • 10.5: Thermal Energy
    • 10.6: Using the Law of Conservation of Energy (3)
    • 10.7: Energy in Collisions (2)
    • 10.8: Power (1)
    • 10: General Problems (14)
    • 10: Conceptual Questions
    • 10: Extra Problems (6)

  • Chapter 11: Using Energy
    • 11.1: Transforming Energy
    • 11.2: Energy in the Body: Energy Inputs
    • 11.3: Energy in the Body: Energy Outputs
    • 11.4: Thermal Energy and Temperature
    • 11.5: Heat and the First Law of Thermodynamics (2)
    • 11.6: Heat Engines (3)
    • 11.7: Heat Pumps (2)
    • 11.8: Entropy and the Second Law of Thermodynamics
    • 11: General Problems (2)
    • 11: Conceptual Questions
    • 11: Extra Problems (4)

  • Chapter 12: Thermal Properties of Matter
    • 12.1: The Atomic Model of Matter
    • 12.2: The Atomic model of an Ideal Gas
    • 12.3: Ideal-Gas Processes (2)
    • 12.4: Thermal Expansion
    • 12.5: Specific Heat and Heat of Transformation (3)
    • 12.6: Calorimetry (4)
    • 12.7: Thermal Properties of Gases (2)
    • 12.8: Heat Transfer
    • 12: General Problems (13)
    • 12: Conceptual Questions
    • 12: Extra Problems (1)

  • Chapter 13: Fluids
    • 13.1: Fluids and Density (1)
    • 13.2: Pressure (2)
    • 13.3: Measuring and Using Pressure (1)
    • 13.4: Buoyancy (1)
    • 13.5: Fluids in Motion (2)
    • 13.6: Fluid Dynamics
    • 13.7: Viscosity and Poiseuille's Equation
    • 13: General Problems (8)
    • 13: Conceptual Questions
    • 13: Extra Problems (1)

  • Chapter 14: Oscillations
    • 14.1: Equilibrium and Oscillation
    • 14.2: Linear Restoring Forces and Simple Harmonic Motion
    • 14.3: Describing Simple Harmonic Motion (5)
    • 14.4: Energy in Simple Harmonic Motion (5)
    • 14.5: Pendulum Motion (4)
    • 14.6: Damped Oscillations (1)
    • 14.7: Driven Oscillations and Resonance
    • 14: General Problems (7)
    • 14: Conceptual Questions
    • 14: Extra Problems (3)

  • Chapter 15: Traveling Waves and Sound
    • 15.1: The Wave Model
    • 15.2: Traveling Waves (2)
    • 15.3: Graphical and Mathematical Descriptions of Waves (8)
    • 15.4: Sound and Light Waves (4)
    • 15.5: Energy and Intensity (2)
    • 15.6: Loudness of Sound (1)
    • 15.7: The Doppler Effect and Shock Waves (2)
    • 15: General Problems (10)
    • 15: Conceptual Questions
    • 15: Extra Problems

  • Chapter 16: Superposition and Standing Waves
    • 16.1: The Principle of Superposition (1)
    • 16.2: Standing Waves
    • 16.3: Standing Waves on a String (6)
    • 16.4: Standing Sound Waves (2)
    • 16.5: Speech and Hearing
    • 16.6: The Interference of Waves from Two Sources (5)
    • 16.7: Beats (1)
    • 16: General Problems (9)
    • 16: Conceptual Questions (1)
    • 16: Extra Problems (2)

  • Chapter 17: Wave Optics
    • 17.1: What is Light? (3)
    • 17.2: The Interference of Light (4)
    • 17.3: The Diffraction Grating (1)
    • 17.4: thin-Film Interference (2)
    • 17.5: Single-Slit Interference (2)
    • 17.6: Circular-Aperture Diffraction (3)
    • 17: General Problems (14)
    • 17: Conceptual Questions (5)
    • 17: Extra Problems (4)

  • Chapter 18: Ray Optics
    • 18.1: The Ray Model of Light (1)
    • 18.2: Reflection (4)
    • 18.3: Refraction (1)
    • 18.4: Image Formation by Refraction (2)
    • 18.5: Thin Lenses: Ray Tracing (1)
    • 18.6: Image Formation with Spherical Mirrors (1)
    • 18.7: The Thin-Lens Equation (1)
    • 18: General Problems (12)
    • 18: Conceptual Questions (4)
    • 18: Extra Problems (2)

  • Chapter 19: Optical Instruments
    • 19.1: The Camera (1)
    • 19.2: The Human Eye (2)
    • 19.3: The Magnifier
    • 19.4: The Microscope
    • 19.5: The Telescope
    • 19.6: Color and Dispersion
    • 19.7: Resolution of Optical Instruments
    • 19: General Problems (3)
    • 19: Conceptual Questions (4)
    • 19: Extra Problems (1)

  • Chapter 20: Electric Fields and Forces
    • 20.1: Charges and Forces
    • 20.2: Charges, Atoms, and Molecules (2)
    • 20.3: Coulomb's Law (3)
    • 20.4: The Concept of the Electric Field (4)
    • 20.5: Applications of the Electric Field (3)
    • 20.6: Conductors and Electric Fields
    • 20.7: Forces and Torques in Electric Fields (2)
    • 20: General Problems (18)
    • 20: Conceptual Questions (5)
    • 20: Extra Problems

  • Chapter 21: Electric Potential
    • 21.1: Electric Potential Energy and Electric Potential
    • 21.2: Sources of Electric Potential (1)
    • 21.3: Electric Potential and Conservation of Energy (3)
    • 21.4: Calculating the Electric Potential (5)
    • 21.5: Connecting Potential and Field (3)
    • 21.6: The Electrocardiogram (2)
    • 21.7: Capacitance and Capacitors (3)
    • 21.8: Dielectrics and Capacitors (1)
    • 21.9: Energy and Capacitors (3)
    • 21: General Problems (10)
    • 21: Conceptual Questions (5)
    • 21: Extra Problems (1)

  • Chapter 22: Current and Resistance
    • 22.1: A Model of Current
    • 22.2: Defining and Describing Current (3)
    • 22.3: Batteries and emf (1)
    • 22.4: Connecting Potential and Current (2)
    • 22.5: Ohm's Law and Resistor Circuits (1)
    • 22.6: Energy and Power (1)
    • 22: General Problems (6)
    • 22: Conceptual Questions (5)
    • 22: Extra Problems (1)

  • Chapter 23: Circuits
    • 23.1: Circuit Elements and Diagrams
    • 23.2: Kirchhoff's Laws (2)
    • 23.3: Series and Parallel Circuits (2)
    • 23.4: Measuring Voltage and Current
    • 23.5: More Complex Circuits (4)
    • 23.6: Capacitors in Parallel and Series (4)
    • 23.7: RC Circuits (2)
    • 23.8: Electricity in the Nervous System (2)
    • 23: General Problems (8)
    • 23: Conceptual Questions (5)
    • 23: Extra Problems (5)

  • Chapter 24: Magnetic Fields and Forces
    • 24.1: Magnetism
    • 24.2: The Magnetic Field
    • 24.3: Electric Currents Also Create Magnetic Fields
    • 24.4: Calculating the Magnetic Field Due to a Current (5)
    • 24.5: Magnetic Fields Exert Forces on Moving Charges (4)
    • 24.6: Magnetic Fields Exert Forces on Currents (2)
    • 24.7: Magnetic Fields Exert Torques on Dipoles (1)
    • 24.8: Magnets and Magnetic Materials
    • 24: General Problems (6)
    • 24: Conceptual Questions (5)
    • 24: Extra Problems (2)

  • Chapter 25: EM Induction and EM Waves
    • 25.1: Induced Currents
    • 25.2: Motional emf (1)
    • 25.3: Magnetic Flux (2)
    • 25.4: Faraday's Law (1)
    • 25.5: Induced Fields and Electromagnetic Waves
    • 25.6: Properties of Electromagnetic Waves (5)
    • 25.7: The Photon Model of Electromagnetic Waves (6)
    • 25.8: The Electromagnetic Spectrum (1)
    • 25: General Problems (10)
    • 25: Conceptual Questions (4)
    • 25: Extra Problems (4)

  • Chapter 26: AC Electricity
    • 26.1: Alternating Current (2)
    • 26.2: AC Electricity and Transformers
    • 26.3: Household Electricity
    • 26.4: Biological Effects and Electrical Safety
    • 26.5: Capacitor Circuits (2)
    • 26.6: Inductors and Inductor Circuits (2)
    • 26.7: Oscillation Circuits (2)
    • 26: General Problems (1)
    • 26: Conceptual Questions
    • 26: Extra Problems (3)

  • Chapter 27: Relativity
    • 27.1: Relativity: What's it All About?
    • 27.2: Galilean Relativity (1)
    • 27.3: Einstein's Principle of Relativity (1)
    • 27.4: Events and Measurements
    • 27.5: The Relativity of Simultaneity (2)
    • 27.6: Time Dilation (2)
    • 27.7: Length Contraction (3)
    • 27.8: Velocities of Objects in Special Relativity (1)
    • 27.9: Relativistic Momentum (1)
    • 27.10: Relativistic Energy (2)
    • 27: General Problems (9)
    • 27: Conceptual Questions
    • 27: Extra Problems (1)

  • Chapter 28: Quantum Physics
    • 28.1: X Rays and X-Ray Diffraction (4)
    • 28.2: The Photoelectric Effect (4)
    • 28.3: Photons (2)
    • 28.4: Matter Waves (3)
    • 28.5: Energy Is Quantized (3)
    • 28.6: Energy Levels and Quantum Jumps (1)
    • 28.7: The Uncertainty Principle (3)
    • 28: General Problems (11)
    • 28: Conceptual Questions (4)
    • 28: Extra Problems (4)

  • Chapter 29: Atoms and Molecules
    • 29.1: Spectroscopy (1)
    • 29.2: Atoms (2)
    • 29.3: Bohr's Models of Atomic Quantization (2)
    • 29.4: The Bohr Hydrogen Atom (3)
    • 29.5: The Quantum-Mechanical Hydrogen Atom (3)
    • 29.6: Multielectron Atoms (2)
    • 29.7: Excited States and Spectra (1)
    • 29.8: Molecules (1)
    • 29.9: Stimulated Emissions and Lasers (1)
    • 29: General Problems (11)
    • 29: Conceptual Questions (3)
    • 29: Extra Problems (2)

  • Chapter 30: Nuclear Physics
    • 30.1: Nuclear Structure (2)
    • 30.2: Nuclear Stability (3)
    • 30.3: Forces and Energy in the Nucleus
    • 30.4: Radiation and Radioactivity (3)
    • 30.5: Nuclear Decay and Half-Lives (3)
    • 30.6: Medical Applications of Nuclear Physics (5)
    • 30.7: The Ultimate Building Blocks of Matter
    • 30: General Problems (6)
    • 30: Conceptual Questions (2)
    • 30: Extra Problems (5)

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Question Group Key
CQ - Conceptual Question
P - Problem
XP - Extra Problem


Question Availability Color Key
BLACK questions are available now
GRAY questions are under development


Group Quantity Questions
Chapter 1: Force and Motion
1.CQ 2 001 017
1.P 6 014 015 016 020 022 024
1.XP 1 001
Chapter 2: Motion in One Dimension
2.P 15 011 017 019 021 030 038 053 054 056 062 063 066 067 068 073
2.XP 6 001 002 003 004 005 006
Chapter 3: Vectors and Motion in Two Dimensions
3.P 27 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 023 029 031 033 042 043 044 045 046 048 049 053 057 058 059 060 063 064 068 072
3.XP 5 001 002 003 004 005
Chapter 4: Forces and Newton's Laws of Motion
4.P 13 009 010 013 015 016 017 021 039 041 062 063 064 065
4.XP 2 001 002
Chapter 5: Applying Newton's Laws
5.P 33 001 002 003 004 011 012 013 017 019 020 021 022 025 026 028 029 032 033 034 035 037 038 041 043 045 046 048 049 051 052 059 064 074
5.XP 2 001 002
Chapter 6: Circular Motion, Orbits, and Gravity
6.P 25 004 005 011 018 019 023 025 026 028 037 038 042 044 045 047 048 049 052 053 054 058 059 061 066 072
6.XP 3 001 002 003
Chapter 7: Rotational Motion
7.P 10 007 021 049 054 056 058 060 061 063 064
7.XP 1 001
Chapter 8: Equilibrium and Elasticity
8.P 9 006 008 020 028 034 035 036 045 051
Chapter 9: Momentum
9.P 26 001 004 006 007 017 019 021 024 026 027 032 033 037 038 039 042 047 049 053 055 057 058 060 066 072 074
9.XP 3 001 002 003
Chapter 10: Energy and Work
10.P 28 003 004 008 011 013 015 019 020 030 031 032 037 038 042 049 050 051 052 053 054 055 057 061 062 065 068 070 072
10.XP 6 001 002 003 004 005 006
Chapter 11: Using Energy
11.P 9 019 022 024 027 028 031 033 059 063
11.XP 4 001 002 003 004
Chapter 12: Thermal Properties of Matter
12.P 24 022 023 032 033 034 040 041 042 043 047 052 061 063 067 070 072 074 077 081 086 089 090 091 096
12.XP 1 001
Chapter 13: Fluids
13.P 15 005 013 015 018 027 030 032 041 046 047 048 050 053 056 061
13.XP 1 001
Chapter 14: Oscillations
14.P 22 006 007 008 009 010 015 016 017 019 020 023 025 026 027 035 044 045 052 053 055 060 066
14.XP 3 001 002 003
Chapter 15: Traveling Waves and Sound
15.P 29 002 005 007 008 010 011 012.XP 014 015 018 022 023 024 026 029 030 038 041 042 050 055 058 062 063 064 071 073 076 077
Chapter 16: Superposition and Standing Waves
16.CQ 1 006
16.P 24 003 007 008 012 013 014 015 019 020 028 029 030 031 032 033 043 046 049 051 054 055 057 060 061
16.XP 2 001 002
Chapter 17: Wave Optics
17.CQ 5 002 009 019 022 024
17.P 29 001 002 004 007 010 011 012 015 021 024 028 029 034 035 036 037 038 047 048 050 051 055 057 062 063 069 072 074 075
17.XP 4 001 002 003 004
Chapter 18: Ray Optics
18.CQ 4 020 021 022 024
18.P 23 003 005 007 009 010 015 016 017 021 025 029 041 042 043 048 050 051 052 054 056 059 064 073
18.XP 2 001 002
Chapter 19: Optical Instruments
19.CQ 4 012 019 020 021
19.P 6 001 009 010 055 056 057
19.XP 1 001
Chapter 20: Electric Fields and Forces
20.CQ 5 026 027 028 029 030
20.P 32 003 004 009 013 015 019 021 024 025 026 030 031 035 036 038 041 042 043 044 046 047 051 053 057 060 063 064 065 072 073 074 075
Chapter 21: Electric Potential
21.CQ 5 010 014 017 028 030
21.P 31 001 006 008 010 013 014 016 017 018 020 023 024 025 026 027 030 033 038 039 040 043 049 050 053 060 063 065 068 075 076 081
21.XP 1 001
Chapter 22: Current and Resistance
22.CQ 5 011 012 013 015 020
22.P 14 006 008 009 017 025 029 031 036 043 048 050 057 067 068
22.XP 1 001
Chapter 23: Circuits
23.CQ 5 030 031 032 034 036
23.P 24 004 008 010 011 017 018 022 029 033 034 036 037 041 044 047 049 051 052 058 067 069 073 074 075
23.XP 5 001 002 003 004 005
Chapter 24: Magnetic Fields and Forces
24.CQ 5 034 036 037 038 039
24.P 18 005 013 015 016 017 020 022 023 026 030 031 040 047 048 050 051 058 059
24.XP 2 001 002
Chapter 25: EM Induction and EM Waves
25.CQ 4 032 033 035 036
25.P 26 001 008 011 012 020 024 027 029 032 034 036 037 038 039 042 045 046 058 059 061 062 064 068 070 072 073
25.XP 4 001 002 003 004
Chapter 26: AC Electricity
26.P 9 002 006 027 031 036 037 041 044 059
26.XP 3 001 002 003
Chapter 27: Relativity
27.P 22 002 009 011 015 017 020 021 022 023 029 030 034 036 044 047 053 055 060 063 067 068 071
27.XP 1 001
Chapter 28: Quantum Physics
28.CQ 4 026 029 034 035
28.P 31 001 002 003 005 006 007 008 010 014 016 027 028 030 034 036 037 039 043 045 046 047 049 051 053 064 065 066 068 069 074 077
28.XP 4 001 002 003 004
Chapter 29: Atoms and Molecules
29.CQ 3 023 026 028
29.P 27 003 004 007 009 010 013 016 019 020 022 023 026 028 033 038 041 045 048 049 052 054 056 062 065 069 072 073
29.XP 2 001 002
Chapter 30: Nuclear Physics
30.CQ 2 028 032
30.P 22 001 004 005 007 009 019 020 023 029 031 033 035 037 038 039 041 053 054 057 058 059 065
30.XP 5 001 002 003 004 005
Total 758