Statistics: Concepts and Controversies 9th edition

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David S. Moore and William I. Notz
Publisher: W. H. Freeman

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  • Chapter 1: Where Do Data Come From?
    • 1.1: Talking about data: Individuals and variables
    • 1.2: Observational studies
    • 1.3: Sample surveys (1)
    • 1.4: Census
    • 1.5: Experiments (1)
    • 1: Check the Basics (4)
    • 1: Exercises (7)

  • Chapter 2: Samples, Good and Bad
    • 2.1: How to sample badly
    • 2.2: Simple random samples
    • 2.3: Can you trust a sample?
    • 2: Check the Basics (4)
    • 2: Exercises (6)

  • Chapter 3: What Do Samples Tell Us?
    • 3.1: From sample to population
    • 3.2: Sampling variability
    • 3.3: Margin of error and all that (1)
    • 3.4: Confidence statements (1)
    • 3.5: Sampling from large populations
    • 3.6: Statistical Controversies: Should Election Polls Be Banned?
    • 3: Check the Basics (5)
    • 3: Exercises (10)

  • Chapter 4: Sample Surveys in the Real World
    • 4.1: How sample surveys go wrong
    • 4.2: Sampling errors
    • 4.3: Nonsampling errors
    • 4.4: Wording questions
    • 4.5: How to live with nonsampling errors
    • 4.6: Sample design in the real world
    • 4.7: The challenge of Internet surveys
    • 4.8: Statistical Controversies: The Harris Online Poll
    • 4.9: Probability samples
    • 4.10: Questions to ask before you believe a poll
    • 4: Check the Basics (3)
    • 4: Exercises (12)

  • Chapter 5: Experiments, Good and Bad
    • 5.1: Talking about experiments
    • 5.2: How to experiment badly
    • 5.3: Randomized comparative experiments (1)
    • 5.4: The logic of experimental design
    • 5.5: Statistical significance
    • 5.6: How to live with observational studies
    • 5: Check the Basics (3)
    • 5: Exercises (9)

  • Chapter 6: Experiments in the Real World
    • 6.1: Equal treatment for all
    • 6.2: Double-blind experiments
    • 6.3: Refusals, nonadherers, and dropouts
    • 6.4: Can we generalize?
    • 6.5: Experimental design in the real world
    • 6.6: Matched pairs and block designs
    • 6.7: Statistical Controversies: Is It or Isn't It a Placebo?
    • 6: Check the Basics (2)
    • 6: Exercises (9)

  • Chapter 7: Data Ethics
    • 7.1: First principles
    • 7.2: Institutional review boards
    • 7.3: Informed consent
    • 7.4: Confidentiality
    • 7.5: Clinical trials
    • 7.6: Statistical Controversies: Hope for Sale?
    • 7.7: Behavioral and social science experiments
    • 7: Check the Basics (2)
    • 7: Exercises (5)

  • Chapter 8: Measuring
    • 8.1: Measurement basics
    • 8.2: Know your variables
    • 8.3: Measurements, valid and invalid
    • 8.4: Statistical Controversies: SAT Exams in College Admissions
    • 8.5: Measurements, accurate and inaccurate
    • 8.6: Improving reliability, reducing bias
    • 8.7: Pity the poor psychologist
    • 8: Check the Basics (1)
    • 8: Exercises (7)

  • Chapter 9: Do the Numbers Make Sense?
    • 9.1: What didn't they tell us?
    • 9.2: Are the numbers consistent with each other?
    • 9.3: Are the numbers plausible?
    • 9.4: Are the numbers too good to be true?
    • 9.5: Is the arithmetic right?
    • 9.6: Is there a hidden agenda?
    • 9: Check the Basics (2)
    • 9: Exercises (7)

  • Chapter P1: Part I Review Exercises
    • P1: Part I Review Exercises (11)

  • Chapter 10: Graphs, Good and Bad
    • 10.1: Data tables
    • 10.2: Types of variables
    • 10.3: Pie charts and bar graphs
    • 10.4: Beware the pictogram
    • 10.5: Change over time: Line graphs
    • 10.6: Watch those scales!
    • 10.7: Making good graphs
    • 10: Check the Basics
    • 10: Exercises (9)

  • Chapter 11: Displaying Distributions with Graphs
    • 11.1: Histograms
    • 11.2: Interpreting histograms
    • 11.3: Stemplots
    • 11: Check the Basics (2)
    • 11: Exercises (7)

  • Chapter 12: Describing Distributions with Numbers
    • 12.1: Median and quartiles
    • 12.2: The five-number summary and boxplots
    • 12.3: Statistical Controversies: Income Inequality
    • 12.4: Mean and standard deviation
    • 12.5: Choosing numerical descriptions
    • 12: Check the Basics (1)
    • 12: Exercises (8)

  • Chapter 13: Normal Distributions
    • 13.1: Density curves
    • 13.2: The center and variability of a density curve
    • 13.3: Normal distributions
    • 13.4: The 68–95–99.7 rule
    • 13.5: Standard scores
    • 13.6: Percentiles of Normal distributions
    • 13: Check the Basics (2)
    • 13: Exercises (8)

  • Chapter 14: Describing Relationships: Scatterplots and Correlation
    • 14.1: Scatterplots
    • 14.2: Interpreting scatterplots
    • 14.3: Correlation
    • 14.4: Understanding correlation
    • 14: Check the Basics (1)
    • 14: Exercises (9)

  • Chapter 15: Describing Relationships: Regression, Prediction, and Causation
    • 15.1: Regression lines
    • 15.2: Regression equations
    • 15.3: Understanding prediction
    • 15.4: Correlation and regression
    • 15.5: The question of causation
    • 15.6: Statistical Controversies: Gun Control and Crime
    • 15.7: Evidence for causation
    • 15.8: Correlation, prediction, and big data
    • 15: Check the Basics (2)
    • 15: Exercises (7)

  • Chapter 16: The Consumer Price Index and Government Statistics
    • 16.1: Index numbers
    • 16.2: Fixed market basket price indexes
    • 16.3: Using the CPI
    • 16.4: Understanding the CPI
    • 16.5: Statistical Controversies: Does the CPI Overstate Inflation?
    • 16.6: The place of government statistics
    • 16.7: The question of social statistics
    • 16: Check the Basics
    • 16: Exercises (12)

  • Chapter P2: Part II Review Exercises
    • P2: Part II Review Exercises (9)

  • Chapter 17: Thinking about Chance
    • 17.1: The idea of probability
    • 17.2: The ancient history of chance
    • 17.3: Myths about chance behavior
    • 17.4: Personal probabilities
    • 17.5: Probability and risk
    • 17: Check the Basics (2)
    • 17: Exercises (6)

  • Chapter 18: Probability Models
    • 18.1: Probability models
    • 18.2: Probability rules
    • 18.3: Probability and odds
    • 18.4: Probability models for sampling
    • 18: Check the Basics (1)
    • 18: Exercises (8)

  • Chapter 19: Simulation
    • 19.1: Where do probabilities come from?
    • 19.2: Simulation basics
    • 19.3: Thinking about independence
    • 19.4: More elaborate simulations
    • 19: Check the Basics (1)
    • 19: Exercises (6)

  • Chapter 20: The House Edge: Expected Values
    • 20.1: Expected values
    • 20.2: The law of large numbers
    • 20.3: Thinking about expected values
    • 20.4: Statistical Controversies: The State of Legalized Gambling
    • 20.5: Finding expected values by simulation
    • 20: Check the Basics (1)
    • 20: Exercises (8)

  • Chapter P3: Part III Review Exercises
    • P3: Part III Review Exercises (10)

  • Chapter 21: What Is a Confidence Interval?
    • 21.1: Estimating
    • 21.2: Estimating with confidence
    • 21.3: Understanding confidence intervals
    • 21.4: More on confidence intervals for a population proportion
    • 21.5: The sampling distribution of a sample mean
    • 21.6: Confidence intervals for a population mean
    • 21: Check the Basics (5)
    • 21: Exercises (12)

  • Chapter 22: What Is a Test of Significance?
    • 22.1: The reasoning of statistical tests of significance
    • 22.2: Hypotheses and P-values
    • 22.3: Statistical significance
    • 22.4: Calculating P-values
    • 22.5: Tests for a population mean
    • 22: Check the Basics (4)
    • 22: Exercises (8)

  • Chapter 23: Use and Abuse of Statistical Inference
    • 23.1: Using inference wisely
    • 23.2: The woes of significance tests
    • 23.3: The advantages of confidence intervals
    • 23.4: Significance at the 5% level isn't magical
    • 23.5: Statistical Controversies: Should Hypothesis Tests Be Banned?
    • 23.6: Beware of searching for significance
    • 23.7: Inference as decision
    • 23: Check the Basics (5)
    • 23: Exercises (8)

  • Chapter 24: Two-Way Tables and the Chi-Square Test
    • 24.1: Two-way tables
    • 24.2: Inference for a two-way table
    • 24.3: The chi-square test
    • 24.4: Using the chi-square test
    • 24.5: Simpson's paradox
    • 24: Check the Basics (5)
    • 24: Exercises (7)

  • Chapter P4: Part IV Review Exercises
    • P4: Part IV Review Exercises (12)


Statistics: Concepts and Controversies, 9th edition, by Moore and Notz introduces liberal arts majors to statistical ideas and shows them how to use those ideas to think about the statistical claims they see every day, from polls, campaigns, advertising, public policy, and many different fields of study. The ultimate goal is to equip students with solid statistical reasoning skills that will help them understand the impact of statistics on all aspects of our lives. The new edition offers SCC's signature combination of engaging cases, real-life examples and exercises, helpful pedagogy, rich full-color design, and innovative media learning tools, all significantly updated. The WebAssign component for this title engages students with many resources and links to a complete eBook.

Features

  • Every WebAssign question links to applicable chapters in a fully integrated eBook.
  • Learning Curve adaptive quizzing available for every chapter.
  • StatTutors provide multimedia tutorials with built-in assessments that explore important statistics concepts and procedures.
  • Video Technology Manuals provide brief instructions for using specific statistical software (over 50 topics/videos per software) and are available for TI-83/84 calculators, JMP, Excel, Minitab, SPSS, R, and RCmdr.
  • Statistical Videos consist of StatClips, StatClips Examples, Statistically Speaking "Snapshots," and StatBoards, including animated lecture videos, whiteboard lessons, and documentary-style footage that illustrate key statistical concepts and help students visualize statistics in real-world scenarios.
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Questions Available within WebAssign

Many questions from this textbook are available in WebAssign. The online questions are identical to the textbook questions except for minor wording changes necessary for Web use. Whenever possible, variables, numbers, or words have been randomized so that each student receives a unique version of the question. This list is updated nightly.

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Group Quantity Questions
Chapter P1: Part I Review Exercises
P1.R 11 003 005 007 011 012 013 017 021 022 023 024
Chapter P2: Part II Review Exercises
P2.R 9 001 003 005 014 015 016 017 021 022
Chapter P3: Part III Review Exercises
P3.R 10 008 010 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019
Chapter P4: Part IV Review Exercises
P4.R 12 001 002 003 004 005 011 016 017 018 023 026 027
Chapter 1: Where Do Data Come From?
1.E 13 001 002 003 004 005 006 008 009 011 012 013 016 021
Chapter 2: Samples, Good and Bad
2.E 10 004 005 006 007 009 010 011 012 016 025
Chapter 3: What Do Samples Tell Us?
3.E 17 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 013 018 019 022 023 024 035 037
Chapter 4: Sample Surveys in the Real World
4.E 15 003 006 007 008 012 013 015 017 018 021 024 025 026 030 034
Chapter 5: Experiments, Good and Bad
5.E 13 001 002 004 006 007 008 009 011 016 017 019 026 028
Chapter 6: Experiments in the Real World
6.E 11 004 007 010 014 017 019 020 024 027 028 030
Chapter 7: Data Ethics
7.E 7 007 009 016 019 020 028 033
Chapter 8: Measuring
8.E 8 003 008 011 012 014 025 029 032
Chapter 9: Do the Numbers Make Sense?
9.E 9 004 005 008 019 020 023 025 028 031
Chapter 10: Graphs, Good and Bad
10.E 9 010 011 013 016 024 025 028 029 030
Chapter 11: Displaying Distributions with Graphs
11.E 9 005 006 008 009 013 015 018 019 021
Chapter 12: Describing Distributions with Numbers
12.E 9 008 012 013 016 020 022 031 032 037
Chapter 13: Normal Distributions
13.E 10 006 008 012 013 014 015 022 024 028 032
Chapter 14: Describing Relationships: Scatterplots and Correlation
14.E 10 004 011 015 017 018 025 029 032 034 036
Chapter 15: Describing Relationships: Regression, Prediction, and Causation
15.E 9 006 008 009 014 015 017 022 027 028
Chapter 16: The Consumer Price Index and Government Statistics
16.E 12 008 009 010 011 015 016 017 018 019 022 023 033
Chapter 17: Thinking about Chance
17.E 8 003 004 011 015 018 020 026 032
Chapter 18: Probability Models
18.E 9 007 008 009 010 011 015 018 020 021
Chapter 19: Simulation
19.E 7 005 008 012 016 021 024 028
Chapter 20: The House Edge: Expected Values
20.E 9 005 008 009 010 012 018 021 025 028
Chapter 21: What Is a Confidence Interval?
21.E 17 004 005 006 007 008 009 013 015 016 021 022 028 029 030 035 036 038
Chapter 22: What Is a Test of Significance?
22.E 12 004 005 006 007 012 015 018 020 023 030 032 036
Chapter 23: Use and Abuse of Statistical Inference
23.E 13 003 004 005 006 007 011 015 019 021 025 027 028 029
Chapter 24: Two-Way Tables and the Chi-Square Test
24.E 12 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 013 014 019 021 023
Total 300