Mind on Statistics 3rd edition

Textbook Cover

Jessica M. Utts and Robert F. Heckard
Publisher: Cengage Learning

enhanced content

Enhanced Webassign

Includes pedagogical tools such as assignable simulations, textbook examples, links to the eBook, and algorithmic solutions. Specific features vary from book to book.

lifetime of edition

Lifetime of Edition (LOE)

Your students are allowed unlimited access to WebAssign courses that use this edition of the textbook at no additional cost.


Access is contingent on use of this textbook in the instructor's classroom.

Academic Term Homework
Higher Education Single Term N/A
High School N/A

Online price per student per course or lab, bookstore price varies. Access cards can be packaged with most any textbook, please see your textbook rep or contact WebAssign

  • Chapter 1: Statistics Success Stories and Cautionary Tales
    • 1: Chapter Exercises (13)
    • Active Examples
    • Active Examples

  • Chapter 2: Turning Data Into Information
    • 2.1: Raw Data (4)
    • 2.2: Types of Variables (5)
    • 2.3: Summarizing One or Two Categorical Variables (5)
    • 2.4: Exploring Features of Quantitative Data with Pictures (3)
    • 2.5: Numerical Summaries of Quantitative Variables (6)
    • 2.6: How to Handle Outliers
    • 2.7: Features of Bell-Shaped Distributions (8)
    • 2.8: Skillbuilder Applet: The Empirical Rule in Action
    • 2: Chapter Exercises (3)
    • Active Examples
    • Active Examples (5)

  • Chapter 3: Sampling: Surveys and How to Ask Questions
    • 3.1: Collecting and Using Sample Data Wisely (4)
    • 3.2: Margin of Error, Confidence Intervals, and Sample Size (13)
    • 3.3: Choosing a Simple Random Sample
    • 3.4: Other Sampling Methods (3)
    • 3.5: Difficulties and Disasters in Sampling (1)
    • 3.6: How to Ask Survey Questions
    • 3.7: Skillbuilder Applet: Random Sampling in Action
    • 3: Chapter Exercises (4)
    • Active Examples
    • Active Examples (10)

  • Chapter 4: Gathering Useful Data for Examining Relationships
    • 4.1: Speaking the Language of Research Studies (5)
    • 4.2: Designing a Good Experiment (6)
    • 4.3: Designing a Good Observational Study (2)
    • 4.4: Difficulties and Disasters in Experiments and Observational Studies (3)
    • 4: Chapter Exercises (5)
    • Active Examples
    • Active Examples (2)

  • Chapter 5: Relationships Between Quantitative Variables
    • 5.1: Looking for Patterns with Scatterplots (1)
    • 5.2: Describing Linear Patterns with a Regression Line (12)
    • 5.3: Measuring Strength and Direction with Correlation (8)
    • 5.4: Regression and Correlation Difficulties and Disasters (2)
    • 5.5: Correlation Does Not Prove Causation
    • 5.6: Skillbuilder Applet: Exploring Correlation
    • 5: Chapter Exercises (4)
    • Active Examples
    • Active Examples (4)

  • Chapter 6: Relationships Between Categorical Variables
    • 6.1: Displaying Relationships Between Categorical Variables (3)
    • 6.2: Risk, Relative Risk, and Misleading Statistics About Risk (14)
    • 6.3: The Effect of a Third Variable and Simpson's Paradox (1)
    • 6.4: Assessing the Statistical Significance of a 2x2 Table (2)
    • 6: Chapter Exercises (3)
    • Active Examples
    • Active Examples (4)

  • Chapter 7: Probability
    • 7.1:Random Circumstances (3)
    • 7.2:Interpretations of Probability (5)
    • 7.3: Probability Definitions and Relationships (2)
    • 7.4: Basic Rules for Finding Probabilities (8)
    • 7.5: Strategies for Finding Complicated Probabilities (12)
    • 7.6: Using Simulation to Estimate Probabilities (2)
    • 7.7: Flawed Intuitive Judgments About Probability (2)
    • 7: Chapter Exercises (17)
    • Active Examples
    • Active Examples (6)

  • Chapter 8: Random Variables
    • 8.1: What Is a Random Variables? (3)
    • 8.2: Discrete Random Variables (10)
    • 8.3: Expectations for Random Variables (13)
    • 8.4: Binomial Random Variables (8)
    • 8.5: Continuous Random Variables (1)
    • 8.6: Normal Random Variables (12)
    • 8.7: Approximating Binomial Distribution Probabilities (3)
    • 8.8: Sums, Differences, and Combinations of Random Variables (8)
    • 8: Chapter Exercises (8)
    • Active Examples
    • Active Examples (10)

  • Chapter 9: Understanding Sampling Distributions: Statistics as Random Variables
    • 9.1: Parameters, Statistics, and Statistical Inference
    • 9.2: From Curiosity to Questions About Parameters
    • 9.3: SD Module 0: An Overview of Sampling Distributions
    • 9.4: SD Module 1: Sampling Distribution for One Sample Proportion (8)
    • 9.5: SD Module 2: Sampling Distribution for The Difference in Two Sample Proportion (2)
    • 9.6: SD Module 3: Sampling Distribution for One Sample Mean (3)
    • 9.7: SD Module 4: Sampling Distribution for the Sample Mean of Paired Differences
    • 9.8: SD Module 5: Sampling Distribution for the Difference in Two Sample Means
    • 9.9: Preparing for Statistical Inference: Standardized Statistics (7)
    • 9.10: Generalizations Beyond the Big Five (6)
    • 9.11: Skillbuilder Applet: Finding the Pattern in Sample Means (1)
    • 9: Chapter Exercises (3)
    • Active Examples
    • Active Examples (6)

  • Chapter 10: Estimating Proportions with Confidence
    • 10.1: Introduction (3)
    • 10.2: CI Module 0: An Overview of Confidence Intervals (1)
    • 10.3: CI Module 1: Confidence Interval for a Population Proportion (13)
    • 10.4: CI Module 2: Confidence Intervals for the Difference in Two Population Proportions (2)
    • 10.5: Using Confidence Intervals to Guide Decisions (1)
    • 10: Chapter Exercises (8)
    • Active Examples
    • Active Examples (4)

  • Chapter 11: Estimating Means with Confidence
    • 11.1: Introduction to Confidence Intervals for Means (6)
    • 11.2: CI Module 3: Confidence Interval for One Population Mean (10)
    • 11.3: CI Module: Confidence Interval for the Population Mean of Paired Differences
    • 11.4: CI Module 5: Confidence Interval for the Difference in Two Population Means (7)
    • 11.5: Understanding Any Confidence Interval (3)
    • 11.6: Skillbuilder Applet: The Confidence Level in Action
    • 10: Chapter Exercises (16)
    • Active Examples
    • Active Examples (9)

  • Chapter 12: Testing Hypotheses About Proportions
    • 12.1: Introduction (1)
    • 12.2: HT Module 0: An Overview of Hypothesis Testing (21)
    • 12.3: HT Module 1: Testing Hypotheses About a Population Proportion (10)
    • 12.4: HT Module 2: Testing Hypotheses About the Difference in Two Population Proportions (7)
    • 12.5: Sample Size, Statistical Significance, and Practical Importance (3)
    • 12: Chapter Exercises (11)
    • Active Examples
    • Active Examples (7)

  • Chapter 13: Testing Hypotheses About Means
    • 13.1: Introduction to Hypothesis Test for Means (2)
    • 13.2: HT Module 3: Testing Hypotheses about One Population Mean (9)
    • 13.3: HT Module 4: Testing Hypotheses about the Population Mean of Paired Differences (4)
    • 13.4: HT Module 5: Testing Hypotheses about the Difference in Two Population Means (7)
    • 13.5: The Relationship Between Significance Tests and Confidence Intervals (3)
    • 13.6: Choosing an Appropriate Inference Procedure (1)
    • 13.7: Effect Size (4)
    • 13.8: Evaluating Significance in Research Reports
    • 13: Chapter Exercises (6)
    • Active Examples
    • Active Examples (6)

  • Chapter 14: Inference About Simple Regression
    • 14.1: Sample and Population Regression Models (5)
    • 14.2: Estimating the Standard Deviation for Regression (4)
    • 14.3: Inference About the Slope of a Linear Regression (2)
    • 14.4: Predicting y and Estimating Mean y at a Specific x (1)
    • 14.5: Checking Conditions for Using Regression Models for Inference (2)
    • 14: Chapter Exercises (8)
    • Active Examples
    • Active Examples (5)

  • Chapter 15: More Inference About Categorical Variables
    • 15.1: The Chi-Square Test for Two-Way Tables (9)
    • 15.2: Analyzing 2x2 Tables (5)
    • 15.3: Testing Hypotheses About One Categorical Variable: Goodness-of-Fit (5)
    • 15: Chapter Exercises (4)
    • Active Examples
    • Active Examples (8)

  • Chapter 16: Analysis of Variance
    • 16.1: Comparing Means with an ANOVA F-Test (3)
    • 16.2: Details of One-Way Analysis of Variance (7)
    • 16.3: Other Methods for Comparing Populations (3)
    • 16.4: Two-Way Analysis of Variance (1)
    • 16: Chapter Exercises (3)
    • Active Examples
    • Active Examples (6)

  • Chapter 17: Turning Information Into Wisdom
    • 17: Chapter Exercises (13)
    • Active Examples
    • Active Examples (1)

Enhanced WebAssign from Brooks/Cole

The content for this textbook is part of the Enhanced WebAssign series from Brooks/Cole. An Enhanced WebAssign access card is required for this book. This special access card can be packaged with a new textbook. Students have access to these materials for as long as they are enrolled in a WebAssign course using this textbook. The access card can also be purchased online or at the bookstore by students who need access.

Please discuss how to order your textbook packaged with WebAssign with your textbook representative or WebAssign.

When you use WebAssign with the pedagogy and content found in this textbook, you have access to the best-in-breed solution to your homework and assessment needs. With WebAssign, your students are able to interact with the very concepts they are learning about! (more...)

Questions Available within WebAssign

Most questions from this textbook are available in WebAssign. The online questions are identical to the textbook questions except for minor wording changes necessary for Web use. Whenever possible, variables, numbers, or words have been randomized so that each student receives a unique version of the question. This list is updated nightly.

Question Group Key
E - Exercises
AE - Active Examples


Question Availability Color Key
BLACK questions are available now
GRAY questions are under development


Group Quantity Questions
Chapter 1: Statistics Success Stories and Cautionary Tales
1 13 001 002 004 005 006 007 008 012 015 017 020 023 026
Chapter 2: Turning Data Into Information
2 34 001 002 005 006 011 012 013 014 015 022 023 024 026 027 031 033 039 050 052 053 054 063 064 076 078 079 080 083 087 098 099 111 113 119
2.AE 5 004 005 016 018 019
Chapter 3: Sampling: Surveys and How to Ask Questions
3 25 005 009 010 013 018 019 020 021 022 023 025 028 030 031 032 033 034 040 041 042 049 086 090 093 097
3.AE 10 002 004 006 008 009 011 013 015 016 019
Chapter 4: Gathering Useful Data for Examining Relationships
4 21 001 004 007 008 009 020 023 024 030 031 032 037 038 046 047 056 065 066 068 069 078
4.AE 2 001 007
Chapter 5: Relationships Between Quantitative Variables
5 27 004 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 024 025 029 033 034 035 036 040 046 065 067 068 072
5.AE 4 001 006 012 018
Chapter 6: Relationships Between Categorical Variables
6 23 001 003 009 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023 024 025 032 039 042 055 059 060
6.AE 4 001 004 007 014
Chapter 7: Probability
7 51 001 002 003 005 006 008 011 016 017 026 032 033 034 036 038 039 040 043 044 045 046 047 048 049 050 051 052 053 054 055 056 058 064 069 078 079 081 082 083 084 085 087 090 091 092 093 094 095 096 097 098
7.AE 6 002 010 012 014 023 025
Chapter 8: Random Variables
8 66 001 002 003 006 007 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 017 018 020 021 022 023 024 025 026 027 028 029 030 031 034 035 036 037 039 041 042 043 045 049 050 051 053 055 056 057 058 059 060 061 063 065 066 067 069 070 071 072 073 075 076 077 078 081 082 083 084 085 087 088
8.AE 10 003 006 012 017 019 021 022 025 028 029
Chapter 9: Understanding Sampling Distributions: Statistics as Random Variables
9 30 031 033 034 035 036 039 042 043 046 047 056 057 059 085 086 087 089 090 092 099 103 104 105 108 111 114 121 126 129 139
9.AE 6 001 008 009 012 015 016
Chapter 10: Estimating Proportions with Confidence
10 28 002 004 005 014 020 021 022 023 024 025 026 028 029 032 035 036 038 043 046 051 058 071 072 074 075 076 077 078
10.AE 4 002 004 009 012
Chapter 11: Estimating Means with Confidence
11 42 007 008 011 012 013 019 021 023 024 025 028 029 030 031 032 033 044 045 046 047 049 050 051 052 053 054 062 063 064 065 066 067 069 070 071 072 073 074 075 076 077 078
11.AE 9 002 003 005 008 009 011 013 014 015
Chapter 12: Testing Hypotheses About Proportions
12 53 005 008 009 010 011 012 013 017 018 019 020 021 022 024 025 026 027 028 029 031 035 036 041 042 044 045 046 048 050 055 056 057 058 059 060 061 064 067 069 070 072 073 085 086 089 090 091 092 102 105 106 108 109
12.AE 7 001 004 007 011 016 017 018
Chapter 13: Testing Hypotheses About Means
13 36 001 002 010 011 012 013 015 016 018 020 021 024 027 028 029 032 033 034 035 036 037 040 044 045 046 050 054 056 057 060 066 067 069 072 073 078
13.AE 6 001 002 004 005 007 014
Chapter 14: Inference About Simple Regression
14 22 001 002 004 005 006 008 009 010 013 014 015 024 031 034 036 037 038 039 040 041 042 043
14.AE 5 001 003 005 008 009
Chapter 15: More Inference About Categorical Variables
15 23 003 004 005 006 007 009 010 011 015 016 017 019 020 022 026 028 029 033 036 046 050 051 055
15.AE 8 001 002 003 004 009 010 012 013
Chapter 16: Analysis of Variance
16 17 001 006 008 012 013 014 017 018 019 021 022 023 026 032 036 043 050
16.AE 6 001 002 003 006 011 014
Chapter 17: Turning Information Into Wisdom
17 13 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 014 015 018
17.AE 1 002
Total 617