The Science and Engineering of Materials (SI Edition), Enhanced 7th edition

Textbook Cover

Donald R. Askeland and Wendelin J. Wright
Publisher: Cengage Learning

eBook

eBook

Your students can pay an additional fee for access to an online version of the textbook that might contain additional interactive features.

lifetime of edition

Lifetime of Edition (LOE)

Your students are allowed unlimited access to WebAssign courses that use this edition of the textbook at no additional cost.

textbook resources

Textbook Resources

Additional instructional and learning resources are available with the textbook, and might include testbanks, slide presentations, online simulations, videos, and documents.


Access is contingent on use of this textbook in the instructor's classroom.

  • Chapter 1: Introduction to Materials Science and Engineering
    • 1.1: What is Materials Science and Engineering? (1)
    • 1.2: Classification of Materials (7)
    • 1.3: Functional Classification of Materials
    • 1.4: Classification of Materials Based on Structure (1)
    • 1.5: Environmental and Other Effects (2)
    • 1.6: Materials Design and Selection (7)
    • 1: Chapter Quiz (17)
    • 1: Have You Ever Wondered? (1)

  • Chapter 2: Atomic Structure
    • 2.1: The Structure of Materials: Technological Relevance (3)
    • 2.2: The Structure of the Atom (3)
    • 2.3: The Electronic Structure of the Atom (6)
    • 2.4: The Periodic Table (1)
    • 2.5: Atomic Bonding (11)
    • 2.6: Binding Energy and Interatomic Spacing (7)
    • 2.7: The Many Forms of Carbon: Relationships Between Arrangements of Atoms and Materials Properties
    • 2: Chapter Quiz (25)
    • 2: Have You Ever Wondered? (1)

  • Chapter 3: Atomic and Ionic Arrangements
    • 3.1: Short-Range Order versus Long-Range Order (4)
    • 3.2: Amorphous Materials (2)
    • 3.3: Lattice, Basis, Unit Cells, and Crystal Structures (17)
    • 3.4: Allotropic or Polymorphic Transformations (5)
    • 3.5: Points, Directions, and Planes in the Unit Cell (20)
    • 3.6: Interstitial Sites (2)
    • 3.7: Crystal Structures of Ionic Materials (4)
    • 3.8: Covalent Structures (1)
    • 3.9: Diffraction Techniques for Crystal Structure Analysis (4)
    • 3: Chapter Quiz (22)
    • 3: Have You Ever Wondered? (1)

  • Chapter 4: Imperfections in the Atomic and lonic Arrangements
    • 4.1: Point Defects (9)
    • 4.2: Other Point Defects (2)
    • 4.3: Dislocations (5)
    • 4.4: Significance of Dislocations (5)
    • 4.5: Schmid's Law (2)
    • 4.6: Influence of Crystal Structure (2)
    • 4.7: Surface Defects (9)
    • 4.8: Importance of Defects (3)
    • 4: Chapter Quiz (25)
    • 4: Have You Ever Wondered? (1)

  • Chapter 5: Atom and Ion Movements in Materials
    • 5.1: Applications of Diffusion (2)
    • 5.2: Stability of Atoms and Ions (3)
    • 5.3: Mechanisms for Diffusion (1)
    • 5.4: Activation Energy for Diffusion (6)
    • 5.5: Rate of Diffusion (8)
    • 5.6: Factors Affecting Diffusion (1)
    • 5.7: Permeability of Polymers
    • 5.8: Composition Profile (16)
    • 5.9: Diffusion and Materials Processing (3)
    • 5: Chapter Quiz (23)
    • 5: Have You Ever Wondered? (1)

  • Chapter 6: Mechanical Properties: Part One
    • 6.1: Technological Significance
    • 6.2: Terminology for Mechanical Properties (4)
    • 6.3: The Tensile Test: Use of the Stress Strain Diagram (4)
    • 6.4: Properties Obtained from the Tensile Test (10)
    • 6.5: True Stress and True Strain (2)
    • 6.6: The Bend Test for Brittle Materials (8)
    • 6.7: Hardness of Materials (5)
    • 6.8: Nanoindentation (2)
    • 6.9: Strain Rate Effects and Impact Behavior (1)
    • 6.10: Properties Obtained from the Impact Test (1)
    • 6.11: Bulk Metallic Glasses and Their Mechanical Behavior (1)
    • 6.12: Mechanical Behavior at Small Length Scales (3)
    • 6.13: Rheology of Liquids
    • 6: Chapter Quiz (22)
    • 6: Have You Ever Wondered? (1)

  • Chapter 7: Mechanical Properties: Part Two
    • 7.1: Fracture Mechanics (3)
    • 7.2: The Importance of Fracture Mechanics (2)
    • 7.3: Microstructural Features of Fracture in Metallic Materials (1)
    • 7.4: Microstructural Features of Fracture in Ceramics, Glasses, and Composites (1)
    • 7.5: Weibull Statistics for Failure Strength Analysis (3)
    • 7.6: Fatigue
    • 7.7: Results of the Fatigue Test (2)
    • 7.8: Application of Fatigue Testing (11)
    • 7.9: Creep, Stress Rupture, and Stress Corrosion (2)
    • 7.10: Evaluation of Creep Behavior (4)
    • 7.11: Use of Creep Data (5)
    • 7: Chapter Quiz (16)
    • 7: Have You Ever Wondered? (1)

  • Chapter 8: Strain Hardening and Annealing
    • 8.1: Relationship of Cold Working to the Stress Strain Curve (8)
    • 8.2: Strain-Hardening Mechanisms (3)
    • 8.3: Properties versus Percent Cold Work (10)
    • 8.4: Microstructure, Texture Strengthening, and Residual Stresses (7)
    • 8.5: Characteristics of Cold Working (5)
    • 8.6: The Three Stages of Annealing (10)
    • 8.7: Control of Annealing (5)
    • 8.8: Annealing and Materials Processing (2)
    • 8.9: Hot Working (1)
    • 8: Chapter Quiz (20)
    • 8: Have You Ever Wondered? (1)

  • Chapter 9: Principles of Solidification
    • 9.1: Technological Significance (2)
    • 9.2: Nucleation (9)
    • 9.3: Applications of Controlled Nucleation (4)
    • 9.4: Growth Mechanisms (6)
    • 9.5: Solidification Time and Dendrite Size (7)
    • 9.6: Cooling Curves (3)
    • 9.7: Cast Structure (2)
    • 9.8: Solidification Defects (14)
    • 9.9: Casting Processes for Manufacturing Components (3)
    • 9.10: Continuous Casting and Ingot Casting (4)
    • 9.11: Directional Solidification [DS], Single Crystal Growth, and Epitaxial Growth (1)
    • 9.12: Solidification of Polymers and Inorganic Glasses
    • 9.13: Joining of Metallic Materials
    • 9: Chapter Quiz (24)
    • 9: Have You Ever Wondered? (1)

  • Chapter 10: Solid Solutions and Phase Equilibrium
    • 10.1: Phases and the Phase Diagram (7)
    • 10.2: Solubility and Solid Solutions (6)
    • 10.3: Conditions for Unlimited Solid Solubility (5)
    • 10.4: Solid-Solution Strengthening (5)
    • 10.5: Isomorphous Phase Diagrams (15)
    • 10.6: Relationship Between Properties and the Phase Diagram
    • 10.7: Solidification of a Solid-Solution Alloy (1)
    • 10.8: Nonequilibrium Solidification and Segregation (7)
    • 10: Chapter Quiz (24)
    • 10: Have You Ever Wondered? (1)

  • Chapter 11: Dispersion Strengthening and Eutectic Phase Diagrams
    • 11.1: Principles and Examples of Dispersion Strengthening
    • 11.2: Intermetallic Compounds (2)
    • 11.3: Phase Diagrams Containing Three-Phase Reactions (4)
    • 11.4: The Eutectic Phase Diagram (14)
    • 11.5: Strength of Eutectic Alloys (4)
    • 11.6: Eutectics and Materials Processing (1)
    • 11.7: Nonequilibrium Freezing in the Eutectic System (1)
    • 11.8: Nanowires and the Eutectic Phase Diagram
    • 11: Chapter Quiz (19)
    • 11: Have You Ever Wondered? (1)

  • Chapter 12: Dispersion Strengthening by Phase Transformations and Heat Treatment
    • 12.1: Nucleation and Growth in Solid-State Reactions (5)
    • 12.2: Alloys Strengthened by Exceeding the Solubility Limit (2)
    • 12.3: Age or Precipitation Hardening and Its Applications (3)
    • 12.4: Microstructural Evolution in Age or Precipitation Hardening (2)
    • 12.5: Effects of Aging Temperature and Time (3)
    • 12.6: Requirements for Age Hardening (6)
    • 12.7: Use of Age-Hardenable Alloys at High Temperatures (1)
    • 12.8: The Eutectoid Reaction (3)
    • 12.9: Controlling the Eutectoid Reaction (12)
    • 12.10: The Martensitic Reaction and Tempering (7)
    • 12.11: The Shape-Memory Alloys (13)
    • 12: Chapter Quiz (16)
    • 12: Have You Ever Wondered? (1)

  • Chapter 13: Heat Treatment of Steels and Cast Irons
    • 13.1: Designations and Classification of Steels (5)
    • 13.2: Simple Heat Treatments (1)
    • 13.3: Isothermal Heat Treatments (3)
    • 13.4: Quench and Temper Heat Treatments (3)
    • 13.5: Effect of Alloying Elements
    • 13.6: Application of Hardenability (6)
    • 13.7: Specialty Steels
    • 13.8: Surface Treatments (2)
    • 13.9: Weldability of Steel (1)
    • 13.10: Stainless Steels (3)
    • 13.11: Cast Irons (2)
    • 13: Chapter Quiz (25)
    • 13: Have You Ever Wondered? (1)

  • Chapter 14: Nonferrous Alloys
    • 14.1: Aluminum Alloys (4)
    • 14.2: Magnesium and Beryllium Alloys (3)
    • 14.3: Copper Alloys (4)
    • 14.4: Nickel and Cobalt Alloys (2)
    • 14.5: Titanium Alloys (2)
    • 14.6: Refractory and Precious Metals (3)
    • 14: Chapter Quiz (25)
    • 14: Have You Ever Wondered? (1)

  • Chapter 15: Ceramics
    • 15.1: Bonding in Ceramics (3)
    • 15.2: Structures of Crystalline Ceramics (4)
    • 15.3: Defects in Crystalline Ceramics (1)
    • 15.4: Flaws in Ceramics (4)
    • 15.5: Synthesis and Processing of Crystalline Ceramics
    • 15.6: Silica and Silicate Compounds (4)
    • 15.7: Inorganic Glasses (7)
    • 15.8: Glass-Ceramics (1)
    • 15.9: Processing and Applications of Clay Products
    • 15.10: Refractories (1)
    • 15.11: Other Ceramic Materials
    • 15: Chapter Quiz (25)
    • 15: Have You Ever Wondered? (1)

  • Chapter 16: Polymers
    • 16.1: Classification of Polymers (1)
    • 16.2: Addition and Condensation Polymerization (3)
    • 16.3: Degree of Polymerization
    • 16.4: Typical Thermoplastics (4)
    • 16.5: Structure—Property Relationships in Thermoplastics (1)
    • 16.6: Effect of Temperature on Thermoplastics (8)
    • 16.7: Mechanical Properties of Thermoplastics (4)
    • 16.8: Elastomers
    • 16.9: Thermosetting Polymers
    • 16.10: Adhesives
    • 16.11: Polymer Processing and Recycling
    • 16: Chapter Quiz (24)
    • 16: Have You Ever Wondered? (1)

  • Chapter 17: Composites: Teamwork and Synergy in Materials
    • 17.1: Dispersion-Strengthened Composites (8)
    • 17.2: Particulate Composites (8)
    • 17.3: Fiber-Reinforced Composites (2)
    • 17.4: Characteristics of Fiber-Reinforced Composites (8)
    • 17.5: Manufacturing Fibers and Composites (2)
    • 17.6: Fiber-Reinforced Systems and Applications (1)
    • 17.7: Laminar Composite Materials (4)
    • 17.8: Examples and Applications of Laminar Composites
    • 17.9: Sandwich Structures
    • 17: Chapter Quiz (21)
    • 17: Have You Ever Wondered? (1)

  • Chapter 18: Construction Materials
    • 18.1: The Structure of Wood
    • 18.2: Moisture Content and Density of Wood (3)
    • 18.3: Mechanical Properties of Wood (1)
    • 18.4: Expansion and Contraction of Wood (1)
    • 18.5: Plywood
    • 18.6: Concrete Materials
    • 18.7: Properties of Concrete (4)
    • 18.8: Reinforced and Prestressed Concrete
    • 18.9: Asphalt
    • 18: Chapter Quiz (17)
    • 18: Have You Ever Wondered? (1)

  • Chapter 19: Electronic Materials
    • 19.1: Ohm's Law and Electrical Conductivity
    • 19.2: Band Structure of Solids
    • 19.3: Conductivity of Metals and Alloys (16)
    • 19.4: Semiconductors (8)
    • 19.5: Applications of Semiconductors
    • 19.6: General Overview of Integrated Circuit Processing
    • 19.7: Deposition of Thin Films
    • 19.8: Conductivity in Other Materials (2)
    • 19.9: Insulators and Dielectric Properties
    • 19.10: Polarization in Dielectrics (4)
    • 19.11: Electrostriction, Piezoelectricity, and Ferroelectricity (3)
    • 19: Chapter Quiz (20)
    • 19: Have You Ever Wondered? (1)

  • Chapter 20: Magnetic Materials
    • 20.1: Classification of Magnetic Materials
    • 20.2: Magnetic Dipoles and Magnetic Moments (5)
    • 20.3: Magnetization, Permeability, and the Magnetic Field (1)
    • 20.4: Diamagnetic, Paramagnetic, Ferromagnetic, Ferrimagnetic, and Superparamagnetic Materials (7)
    • 20.5: Domain Structure and the Hysteresis Loop (6)
    • 20.6: The Curie Temperature (1)
    • 20.7: Applications of Magnetic Materials (5)
    • 20.8: Metallic and Ceramic Magnetic Materials (7)
    • 20: Chapter Quiz (20)
    • 20: Have You Ever Wondered? (1)

  • Chapter 21: Photonic Materials
    • 21.1: The Electromagnetic Spectrum (1)
    • 21.2: Refraction, Reflection, Absorption, and Transmission (15)
    • 21.3: Selective Absorption, Transmission, or Reflection (2)
    • 21.4: Examples and Use of Emission Phenomena (16)
    • 21.5: Fiber-Optic Communications Systems
    • 21: Chapter Quiz (20)
    • 21: Have You Ever Wondered? (1)

  • Chapter 22: Thermal Properties of Materials
    • 22.1: Heat Capacity and Specific Heat (7)
    • 22.2: Thermal Expansion (8)
    • 22.3: Thermal Conductivity (7)
    • 22.4: Thermal Shock
    • 22: Chapter Quiz (19)
    • 22: Have You Ever Wondered? (1)

  • Chapter 23: Corrosion and Wear
    • 23.1: Chemical Corrosion
    • 23.2: Electrochemical Corrosion
    • 23.3: The Electrode Potential in Electrochemical Cells (12)
    • 23.4: The Corrosion Current and Polarization
    • 23.5: Types of Electrochemical Corrosion (1)
    • 23.6: Protection Against Electrochemical Corrosion (5)
    • 23.7: Microbial Degradation and Biodegradable Polymers
    • 23.8: Oxidation and Other Gas Reactions (3)
    • 23.9: Wear and Erosion
    • 23: Chapter Quiz (24)
    • 23: Have You Ever Wondered? (1)


Ensure that your engineering students understand the relationships between structure, processing and properties of materials with The Science and Engineering of Materials, Enhanced SI Edition, 7th Edition, by Donald R. Askeland and Wendelin J. Wright. This updated, comprehensive approach lets you select the topics best for your course, from a general overview to an emphasis on materials, mechanical behavior or physical properties. Complete, current coverage makes this edition a trusted reference for students throughout future coursework. This science-based approach highlights how the structure of materials at various length scales gives rise to materials properties. Students examine how the connection between structure and properties is key to innovating—from synthesis of new materials to new applications of existing materials. Readers also learn how time, loading and environment impact materials—a key concept often overlooked when using charts and databases to select materials. WebAssign lets you further customize new content to your course need.

Meet the Authors
Donald R. Askeland, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Emeritus

Dr. Donald R. Askeland joined the University of Missouri-Rolla (now the Missouri University of Science and Technology) in 1970 after obtaining his Ph.D. in metallurgical engineering from the University of Michigan. His primary interest is teaching, which has resulted in a variety of campus, university and industry awards as well as the development of this well-respected text. Dr. Askeland is also active in research involving metals casting and metals joining. His focus is primarily in the production, treatment and joining of cast irons, gating, and fluidity of aluminum alloys and optimization of casting processes. Additional work has concentrated on lost foam casting, permanent mold casting, and investment casting. Much of his work is interdisciplinary, providing data for creating computer models and validation of such models.

Wendelin J. Wright, Bucknell University

Dr. Wendelin Wright is a professor at Bucknell University with a joint appointment in the departments of mechanical engineering and chemical engineering. She received her B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. in materials science and engineering from Stanford University. Prior to assuming her current position, Dr. Wright served as a faculty member at Santa Clara University. Her research interests focus on the mechanical behavior of materials, particularly those of metallic glasses. She is the recipient of the 2003 Walter J. Gores Award for Excellence in Teaching (Stanford University's highest teaching honor), a 2005 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers and a 2010 National Science Foundation CAREER Award. Dr. Wright is a licensed professional engineer in metallurgy in California and a fellow of ASM International.

FEATURES
  • NEW "Have You Ever Wondered?" (HYEW) questions in each chapter pique student interest while emphasizing real application. These and other proven learning features highlight how the current information covered in the chapter impacts the real world of engineering today.
  • Read It links under each question quickly jump to the corresponding section of the MindTap Reader eBook.
  • Watch It links provide step-by-step instruction with short, engaging videos that are ideal for visual learners.
  • A Course Pack with ready-to-use assignments, built by subject matter experts specifically for this textbook, are designed to save you time, and can be easily customized to meet your teaching goals.
  • Lecture Slides, Image Banks (Digital image files from the text), Errata (Corrected errors from earlier printings), and a complete Instructor Solution Manual are available as textbook resources.
  • Students are able to immediately apply their knowledge with design problems at the end of each chapter that use the Knovel® online reference tool. These important problems help students recognize the importance of what they are learning as they develop skills critical for future success. The Knovel® Solutions are also available as a textbook resource.
  • COMING SOON: Chapter Quiz (CQ) questions in each chapter encourage students to test and apply what they have learned in each chapter. These questions can serve as a quick and useful self-test to help confirm understanding of each concept.
  • COMING SOON: Expanded Problem (EP) questions are expanded versions of existing questions that include intermediary steps to guide the student to the final answer.

Questions Available within WebAssign

Most questions from this textbook are available in WebAssign. The online questions are identical to the textbook questions except for minor wording changes necessary for Web use. Whenever possible, variables, numbers, or words have been randomized so that each student receives a unique version of the question. This list is updated nightly.

Question Availability Color Key
BLACK questions are available now
GRAY questions are under development


Group Quantity Questions
Chapter 1: Introduction to Materials Science and Engineering
1.CQ 17 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022
1.HYEW 1 001
1.1 1 002
1.2 7 005 006 007 008 011 012 015
1.4 1 018
1.5 2 020 021
1.6 7 023 025 029 030 031 032 034
Chapter 2: Atomic Structure
2.CQ 25 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023 024 025
2.HYEW 1 001
2.1 3 001 002 003
2.2 3 006 007 008
2.3 6 009 010 011 012 013 014
2.4 1 016
2.5 11 019 020 021 022 023 024 025 028 030 031 032
2.6 7 035 036 038 042 043 044 047
Chapter 3: Atomic and Ionic Arrangements
3.CQ 22 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023 024 025
3.HYEW 1 001
3.1 4 001 002 004 005
3.2 2 006 009
3.3 17 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 022 023 024 025 026 027 028 030 034 035
3.4 5 037 039 040 041 042
3.5 20 049 051 052 054 055 056 060 062 064 065 066 067 068 069 070 072 073 075 077 079
3.6 2 081 082
3.7 4 084 085 087 089
3.8 1 095
3.9 4 096 097 098 101
Chapter 4: Imperfections in the Atomic and lonic Arrangements
4.CQ 25 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023 024 025
4.HYEW 1 001
4.1 9 001 002 004 005 007 008 010 011 014
4.2 2 016 017
4.3 5 024 025 027 028 031
4.4 5 033 035 037 038 039
4.5 2 042 043
4.6 2 045 046
4.7 9 050 051 052 053 056 057 058 062 063
4.8 3 067 070 074
Chapter 5: Atom and Ion Movements in Materials
5.CQ 23 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023 024 025
5.HYEW 1 001
5.1 2 001 004
5.2 3 010 011 012
5.3 1 015
5.4 6 017 018 020 021 023 024
5.5 8 028 029 031 032 034 035 037 038
5.6 1 040
5.8 16 049 050 051 053 054 055 057 058 059 062 063 064 066 067 068 070
5.9 3 077 078 080
Chapter 6: Mechanical Properties: Part One
6.CQ 22 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023 024 025
6.HYEW 1 001
6.2 4 004 005 006 011
6.3 4 014 015 016 017
6.4 10 019 022 026 027 028 029 030 032 033 034
6.5 2 037 039
6.6 8 043 044 045 046 047 048 049 051
6.7 5 053 056 057 058 059
6.8 2 061 062
6.9 1 063
6.10 1 072
6.11 1 076
6.12 3 078 079 082
Chapter 7: Mechanical Properties: Part Two
7.CQ 16 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023
7.HYEW 1 001
7.1 3 003 004 006
7.2 2 007 008
7.3 1 013
7.4 1 018
7.5 3 021 022 025
7.7 2 027 044
7.8 11 028 029 032 034 035 036 038 039 040 041 042
7.9 2 047 048
7.10 4 050 051 052 054
7.11 5 056 057 059 062 063
Chapter 8: Strain Hardening and Annealing
8.CQ 20 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023
8.HYEW 1 001
8.1 8 002 005 006 009 010 011 014 015
8.2 3 017 019 021
8.3 10 023 024 025 026 027 031 032 033 036 037
8.4 7 040 042 043 044 045 046 048
8.5 5 050 051 053 054 055
8.6 10 056 057 059 061 063 065 067 069 070 071
8.7 5 072 074 075 079 080
8.8 2 083 084
8.9 1 086
Chapter 9: Principles of Solidification
9.CQ 24 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023 024 025 026
9.HYEW 1 001
9.1 2 002 003
9.2 9 005 009 011 013 015 016 019 020 022
9.3 4 024 026 028 029
9.4 6 032 035 036 037 039 040
9.5 7 043 044 046 048 051 052 053
9.6 3 057 058 059
9.7 2 065 066
9.8 14 069 070 071 073 074 075 076 077 078 083 084 085 086 087
9.9 3 090 091 093
9.10 4 094 097 098 099
9.11 1 100
Chapter 10: Solid Solutions and Phase Equilibrium
10.CQ 24 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023 024
10.HYEW 1 001
10.1 7 004 005 006 007 010 012 013
10.2 6 015 016 018 019 022 023
10.3 5 025 026 028 029 030
10.4 5 031 032 034 036 037
10.5 15 041 044 045 046 050 052 053 054 055 056 057 058 061 062 064
10.7 1 071
10.8 7 078 079 080 083 084 085 087
Chapter 11: Dispersion Strengthening and Eutectic Phase Diagrams
11.CQ 19 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023 024
11.HYEW 1 001
11.2 2 002 003
11.3 4 006 009 010 014
11.4 14 018 019 020 023 024 025 026 027 028 030 032 034 036 038
11.5 4 043 044 045 047
11.6 1 048
11.7 1 051
Chapter 12: Dispersion Strengthening by Phase Transformations and Heat Treatment
12.CQ 16 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023 024
12.HYEW 1 001
12.1 5 001 004 006 008 009
12.2 2 012 015
12.3 3 018 020 021
12.4 2 024 025
12.5 3 028 031 032
12.6 6 034 035 037 038 042 043
12.7 1 045
12.8 3 047 048 049
12.9 12 051 056 058 059 060 061 062 063 066 067 070 072
12.10 7 076 083 085 086 087 089 092
12.11 13 093 095 097 099 101 102 103 104 105 106 110 112 115
Chapter 13: Heat Treatment of Steels and Cast Irons
13.CQ 25 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023 024 025
13.HYEW 1 001
13.1 5 001 003 004 005 007
13.2 1 010
13.3 3 013 014 017
13.4 3 018 022 023
13.6 6 031 034 035 039 040 041
13.8 2 044 045
13.9 1 048
13.10 3 049 051 053
13.11 2 055 058
Chapter 14: Nonferrous Alloys
14.CQ 25 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023 024 025 026 027
14.HYEW 1 001
14.1 4 002 007 008 011
14.2 3 014 015 016
14.3 4 019 020 021 022
14.4 2 025 027
14.5 2 028 031
14.6 3 032 034 036
Chapter 15: Ceramics
15.CQ 25 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023 024 025
15.HYEW 1 001
15.1 3 001 002 004
15.2 4 006 007 008 010
15.3 1 013
15.4 4 016 017 018 020
15.6 4 026 027 028 030
15.7 7 033 034 035 037 038 039 042
15.8 1 044
15.10 1 047
Chapter 16: Polymers
16.CQ 24 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023 024 025
16.HYEW 1 001
16.1 1 004
16.2 3 005 006 008
16.4 4 011 012 013 014
16.5 1 018
16.6 8 019 021 023 025 026 027 028 029
16.7 4 030 031 032 033
Chapter 17: Composites: Teamwork and Synergy in Materials
17.CQ 21 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023 024
17.HYEW 1 001
17.1 8 001 002 005 006 008 009 011 012
17.2 8 013 014 015 016 017 018 020 022
17.3 2 023 025
17.4 8 029 030 032 034 035 036 039 041
17.5 2 044 047
17.6 1 050
17.7 4 054 055 056 057
Chapter 18: Construction Materials
18.CQ 17 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020
18.HYEW 1 001
18.2 3 001 003 004
18.3 1 005
18.4 1 006
18.7 4 011 012 013 014
Chapter 19: Electronic Materials
19.CQ 20 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020
19.HYEW 1 001
19.3 16 002 003 004 005 007 008 010 011 012 016 017 018 019 020 022 024
19.4 8 026 030 031 032 033 035 037 041
19.8 2 042 043
19.10 4 047 048 050 051
19.11 3 055 056 057
Chapter 20: Magnetic Materials
20.CQ 20 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020
20.HYEW 1 001
20.2 5 003 004 005 006 007
20.3 1 008
20.4 7 009 011 013 014 015 016 017
20.5 6 019 023 026 027 028 029
20.6 1 034
20.7 5 038 039 041 042 043
20.8 7 044 048 049 050 051 052 053
Chapter 21: Photonic Materials
21.CQ 20 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020
21.HYEW 1 001
21.1 1 010
21.2 15 003 004 005 007 008 012 013 014 016 017 018 019 020 021 023
21.3 2 025 027
21.4 16 030 033 034 035 036 037 038 040 042 043 044 045 046 047 048 049
Chapter 22: Thermal Properties of Materials
22.CQ 19 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020
22.HYEW 1 001
22.1 7 003 005 006 007 008 009 010
22.2 8 012 014 015 016 018 021 022 023
22.3 7 028 029 030 031 032 033 034
Chapter 23: Corrosion and Wear
23.CQ 24 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023 024
23.HYEW 1 001
23.3 12 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018
23.5 1 020
23.6 5 024 025 032 033 037
23.8 3 038 040 041
Total 1285 (48)